Pediatric Surgery »  Faculty »  Tippi MacKenzie, M.D.

Tippi MacKenzie, M.D.

Associate Professor of Surgery
Division of Pediatric Surgery

Contact Information

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  • 1987-91, Harvard University, B.A., Biochemistry
  • 1992-97, Stanford University School of Medicine, M.D., Medicine
  • 1998-99, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Resident, Surgery
  • 2002-04, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Resident, Surgery
  • 2004-05, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Chief Resident, Surgery
  • 1999-02, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Fellow, Fetal Therapy
  • 2005-07, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Fellow, Pediatric Surgery
  • American Board of Surgery, 2006
  • Fetal Treatment Center
  • Biomedical Sciences Program
  • Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research
  • Center for Maternal-Fetal Precision Medicine
  • Advanced Laparoscopy
  • Birth Defects
  • Endocrine and Biliary Surgery
  • Fetal Surgery
  • Pediatric Surgery
  • In-Utero Stem Cell Transplantation

Dr. Tippi MacKenzie is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the UCSF Division of Pediatric Surgery and the Fetal Treatment Center. Dr. MacKenzie obtained her undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at Harvard, then came to the Bay Area for medical school at Stanford. She did her surgical residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. During this time, she took three years to do research on fetal surgery and in utero stem cell transplantation at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Following residency, she returned to CHOP for her clinical pediatric surgery fellowship.

Dr. MacKenzie's clinical interests include fetal surgery, advanced laparoscopy, and endocrine and biliary surgery.

Dr. MacKenzie has an active laboratory and is a member of the Biomedical Sciences Program and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research. Her research focus is on mechanisms of tolerance induction following in utero stem cell transplantation  and the pathophysiology of prenatally diagnosed diseases, such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia and gastroschisis, to identify biomarkers that predict prognosis and molecular pathways that may be targets for prenatal intervention.

  • $12.1 million from California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to treat babies in the womb who have alpha thalassemia major. This is a blood disorder that is only detected in the last few months of pregnancy and is almost always fatal. Dr. MacKenzie is using hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), taken from the mother's bone marrow, and transplanting them into the baby before birth. The baby's immune system is able to tolerate the mother's cells, increasing the chances of a healthy birth, and improving the chances of having effective treatments after birth.
  • T cell activation and the breakdown of maternal-fetal tolerance in preterm labor, NIH/NIAID, R01AI116880, Jun 15, 2015 - May 31, 2020, Role: Principal Investigator
ResidentYearsGrant or Funding Source
Cerine Jeanty, M.D. 2011-
Eveline Shue, M.D. 2011-2013
Amar Nijagal, M.D. 2009-2012 CA Institute for Regenerative Medicine Clinical Fellow Training Award
Most recent publications from a total of 61
  1. Steurer MA, Peyvandi S, Baer RJ, MacKenzie T, Li BC, Norton ME, Jelliffe-Pawlowski LL, Moon-Grady AJ. Epidemiology of Live Born Infants with Nonimmune Hydrops Fetalis-Insights from a Population-Based Dataset. J Pediatr. 2017 May 19. View in PubMed
  2. Kreger EM, Singer ST, Witt RG, Sweeters N, Lianoglou B, Lal A, Mackenzie TC, Vichinsky E. Favorable Outcomes After In Utero Transfusion in Fetuses with Alpha Thalassemia Major - A Case Series and Review of the Literature. Prenat Diagn. 2016 Nov 9. View in PubMed
  3. Beaudin AE, Boyer SW, Perez-Cunningham J, Hernandez GE, Derderian SC, Jujjavarapu C, Aaserude E, MacKenzie T, Forsberg EC. A Transient Developmental Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gives Rise to Innate-like B and T Cells. Cell Stem Cell. 2016 Dec 01; 19(6):768-783. View in PubMed
  4. Li Y, Phelps A, Zapala MA, MacKenzie JD, MacKenzie TC, Courtier J. Magnetic resonance imaging of Müllerian duct anomalies in children. Pediatr Radiol. 2016 May; 46(6):796-805. View in PubMed
  5. Frascoli M, Jeanty C, Fleck S, Moradi PW, Keating S, Mattis AN, Tang Q, MacKenzie TC. Heightened Immune Activation in Fetuses with Gastroschisis May Be Blocked by Targeting IL-5. J Immunol. 2016 Jun 15; 196(12):4957-66. View in PubMed
  6. Derderian SC, Jayme CM, Cheng LS, Keller RL, Moon-Grady AJ, MacKenzie TC. Mass Effect Alone May Not Explain Pulmonary Vascular Pathology in Severe Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia. Fetal Diagn Ther. 2016; 39(2):117-24. View in PubMed
  7. MacKenzie TC. Fetal Surgical conditions and the unraveling of maternal-fetal tolerance. J Pediatr Surg. 2016 Feb; 51(2):197-9. View in PubMed
  8. Walters MC, MacKenzie TC. A booster shot to cure hemoglobinopathies. Blood. 2015 Sep 3; 126(10):1159-61. View in PubMed
  9. Baer RJ, Chambers CD, Jones KL, Shew SB, MacKenzie TC, Shaw GM, Jelliffe-Pawlowski LL. Maternal factors associated with the occurrence of gastroschisis. Am J Med Genet A. 2015 Jul; 167(7):1534-41. View in PubMed
  10. MacKenzie TC, David AL, Flake AW, Almeida-Porada G. Consensus statement from the first international conference for in utero stem cell transplantation and gene therapy. Front Pharmacol. 2015; 6:15. View in PubMed
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